Carpet Definitions & Glossary

Steam Magic Carpet Cleaning is completely licensed and insured to provide professional expertise and services; catering to the commercial business owners and residential homeowners of Southern California. Our experts are more than qualified to perform any service and utilize premium products and equipment exclusive to licensed professionals to ensure maximum results. We at Steam Magic Carpet Cleaning are always looking for opportunities to serve you, which is why we compiled a glossary of widely used terms used in the carpet cleaning industry to help you get a better understanding of what we do.

Carpet Definitions & Glossary

Blooming: Blooming is an occurrence that untwists the carpet fibers. Blooming happens for several reasons, frequently the cause of the following; incorrect cleaning, improper heat setting, poor maintenance techniques, as well as general wear and tear that occurs over time.
Carpet Tiles: Carpet tiles, unlike wall-to-wall carpeting, are sections of carpet squares that are often used in commercial settings because of their ultra durability. Carpet tiles are available in a variety of ways such as; solid colors, patterned, or texture. Capet tiles are designed to be removable for convenient individual spot cleaning, repairs, or replacement.
Crushing: Crushing, often matting is when the fibers have been bent and compressed. All carpets will eventually experience crushing. To prolong this event you can diligently perform regular maintenance, using firm padding below the carpet, and frequently rearranging your furniture to re-direct traffic patterns.
Denier: Denier is a reference to the total measurement of yarn per carpet area. The carpets noted to be more denier have a higher yarn count.
Face Weight: Face weight is similar to denier, as it plays a vital role in your carpet’s overall performance and durability. Face weight is the total weight of fibers per square yard of carpet.
Fibers: Fibers are the basic material used to construct carpets. Synthetic fibers like nylon, olefin, polyester are just a few examples of the more commonly used fibers used to create carpets. Common organic types of carpet are made from natural fibers such as wool, cotton, silk, and bamboo.
Fray: Fraying is when the carpet fibers have become damaged, expand, and change textures.
Fray is produced in high-traffic adding to the wear and tear and improper cleaning methods such as incorrect cleaning products, scrubbing stains instead of blotting, and other poorly performed maintenance.
Hot Water Extraction: Hot water extraction is used in the cleaning process that agitates carpet to break down the soil and debris compacted deep within the fibers and is highly recommended by carpet manufacturers as a part of regular maintenance.
Maintenance Program: A maintenance program is a scheduled cleaning and restoration service that is customized to meet the unique needs of residential homes and commercial buildings, office spaces, educational settings, and other such facilities.
Padding: Padding, or sometimes referred to as a carpet cushion, is the layer of fabric that is laid on the subfloor before the carpet is installed. Investing in a high quality of padding will prolong the carpet life, appearance, and quality.
Pile: Pile, or sometimes known as nap, is the visible portion of carpet fibers. Cut pile and loop pile are the most common types of piling, but there are several different types and styles of piles.
Pile Reversal: Pile reversal is produced in high-traffic areas that bend the carpet fibers in many directions. Pile reversal is noticeable at pivot points, for example; hallway corners and doorways, it is obvious due to the creation of a discolored impression.
Resilience: Resilience is the carpet’s resistance to crushing and matting. Carpet fiber, padding, backing, and other aspects are used to determine the level of resilience it has.
Rippling: Rippling is a more technical term referencing the wave-like or ruffled patterns that often develop in wall-to-wall carpeting. Excessive amounts of heat and humidity conditions are usually the cause. Rippling can be easily corrected by the help of a qualified contractor or carpet retailer to re-stretch the carpet.
Seam: A seam is the line where two separate pieces of carpet intersect. Avoiding seams is rarely a possibility since most carpet is produced in 12-foot wide rolls, but many qualified installers can significantly minimize the appearance of a seam.
Shedding: Shedding is when the carpets lose some of the fibers; usually following the installation on new carpet, and continues for several weeks. Shedding fairly common in cut pile and wool carpets and less frequently in synthetic fiber carpets. Regular vacuuming controls the mess.
Soiling: Soiling is when dirt particles, germs, and grime builds up under the carpet fibers, and the air pushes it upward. A maintenance program, regularly scheduled professional carpet cleaning services, and routine vacuuming are all ways to prevent soiling from occurring.
Tufting: Tufting is the first step in the carpet manufacturing process, and is defined as the loop (cut or uncut) of pile.